sleep

Sleep Hacks: How To Sleep Better

If you are like most people, your job and lifestyle probably wreak havoc on your sleeping schedule.

Getting the proper sleeping regime down pact will take time and diligence on your part; but the rewards are endless. The best part is, it only takes some minor lifestyle changes to start feeling the positive effects immediately.

So what are you waiting for? Read on, stay focused and get ready to get some of the best sleep of your life with these simple sleep hacks.

Tip # 1 - Create a schedule of when to go to bed and wake up. Stick to it! Going to bed and waking up at the same time everyday will eventually set your circadian rhythm.

Tip # 2 - No nanna naps throughout the day! Napping throws off that rhythm your body needs for the accurate amount of sleep.

Tip # 3 - Avoid eating before bedtime. If you get hungry at night try to find something low in artificial sugars and sodium find something high in fibre.

Tip # 4 - Dimming the lights a couple hours before getting into bed. Stay away from technology at least two hours prior to bed. The stimulation keeps you awake and by knocking all the work or pleasure out couple hours before that scheduled bed time your body has time to settle down into rest.

Tip # 5 - Write everything down about your day and what you want to accomplish tomorrow. This will not only help you evaluate how much you did throughout the day, but also help prepare and settle your mind knowing what has to be accomplished tomorrow. 6.    If you can’t sleep, get out of bed and do something productive. 7.    When the weekend comes along, try not to sleep in. 

Works Cited

Why lack of sleep is bad for your health. (2015, June 15). Retrieved February 8, 2017, from http://www.nhs.uk/Livewell/tiredness-and-fatigue/Pages/lack-of-sleep-health-risks.aspx Berkley, C. (n.d.).

What You Eat Can Sabotage Your Sleep. Retrieved February 9, 2017, from http://www.webmd.com/sleep-disorders/features/food-sabotage-sleep#1 How much sleep do we really need? (2017, February 8). Retrieved from National Sleep Foundation (n.d.). Retrieved February 8, 2017, from https://sleepfoundation.org/how-sleep-works/how-much-sleep-do-we-really-need/page/0/2 Peri, C. (2014, February 13).

10 Things to Hate About Sleep Loss (J. Beckman MD, Ed.). Retrieved February 8, 2017, from http://www.webmd.com/sleep-disorders/features/10-results-sleep-loss#3

Sleep Hacks: What To Do If You Don't Get Enough Sleep

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Do you toss and turn every night for what feels like hours of restlessness upon end?

Not getting the proper amount of sleep can affect your mood, judgment and ability to learn and remember information.

At first glance, getting an inadequate amount of sleep over a long period of time doesn’t seem like a big deal; but not getting your proper beauty sleep can have a severe impact on your health.

In some extreme cases, prolonged sleep deprivation can increase the risk of having a serious car accident or heavy machinery accident – yikes.

Research has found that people not getting the proper amount of sleep will also increase their risk of:

• Uncontrollable weight gain

• Diabetes

• Mood disorders

• Heart complications

• High blood pressure

• Stroke

• Hormonal imbalances

So why aren’t you getting enough sleep? Why is sleep such a precious commodity in your busy lifestyle?  Read on to discover 3 factors that could be affecting your ability to switch off. Time to switch them off too!

Technology

The biggest obstacle preventing us from getting enough sleep is technology. Whether it’s our phones, video games, televisions or computers, this interaction we have created with technology wreaks havoc on our circadian rhythm. It over-stimulates our brains during those crucial periods throughout the rhythm where we should begin feeling sleepy but instead we sit staring at a screen like zombies. I know it may be difficult, but try to avoid all interaction with technology 2-3 hours before bedtime. Read some pages of a book, draw something, write down everything you want to accomplish the next day or even take some time to call a loved one and have a nice chat. The time before sleep shouldn’t be spent in front of a screen.

Lighting

The blue light emanating from technology - your phone, television, computer, kindle etc - can disrupt your sleeping patterns and keep you awake at night. This can be easily avoided by dimming the lights throughout your home as the night progresses, right up until bedtime. Depending on what time you go to bed, turn off at least 60% of the light in your home at least three hours before bedtime. This will help your body prepare itself for a more peaceful and easy night of sleep.

Eating Late

It generally takes anywhere from 12-24 hours for a healthy individual to digest food and eliminate waste. The beginning phases of digestion break down the food and release nutrients into our blood stream to be delivered throughout various parts of the body. Once you eat something, your body cannot shut off the digesting process. This is because your body wants to take in food and quickly convert it into a useful source of energy. Depending on your diet, the sugars in food can keep you awake at night. Since the body is at rest (or trying to), food will turn into fat and get wasted as a valuable energy source. Try to eat lighter, more frequent meals throughout the day and avoid foods high in sugar and fat later in the evening.

Works Cited

Why lack of sleep is bad for your health. (2015, June 15). Retrieved February 8, 2017, from http://www.nhs.uk/Livewell/tiredness-and-fatigue/Pages/lack-of-sleep-health-risks.aspx Berkley, C. (n.d.).

What You Eat Can Sabotage Your Sleep. Retrieved February 9, 2017, from http://www.webmd.com/sleep-disorders/features/food-sabotage-sleep#1

How much sleep do we really need? (2017, February 8). Retrieved from National Sleep Foundation (n.d.). Retrieved February 8, 2017, from https://sleepfoundation.org/how-sleep-works/how-much-sleep-do-we-really-need/page/0/2 Peri, C. (2014, February 13).

10 Things to Hate About Sleep Loss. (J. Beckman MD, Ed.). Retrieved February 8, 2017, from http://www.webmd.com/sleep-disorders/features/10-results-sleep-loss#3

Sleep Hacks: How Much Sleep Do You Need?

The easiest way to achieve a healthy lifestyle begins with giving your body the proper amount of sleep, in order to rejuvenate, reset and prepare yourself physically and mentally for the next day.

Unfortunately, living the busy lifestyles we do, achieving a decent night’s shuteye can easily become more pipe dream than sweet dream.

The human body’s sleep/wake cycle is known as the circadian rhythm. This rhythm is internal and is, for the most part, unknowingly designed by you. It creates the feeling of sleepiness when it’s dark outside and also that feeling of wakefulness when the sun is out.

The amount of sleep each person need varies between individuals, as each and every one of us varies in age, lifestyle, and health. Generally, the younger you are in age, the more sleep you actually need per day. Refer to the guide below to see where you sit on the spectrum:

• Newborns and Infants: about 12 -19 hours

• Toddlers and Preschoolers: anywhere from 10-14 hours

• 6-13 years: 9-11 hours

• 14-18 years: 8-10 hours

• 18-25 years: 7-10 hours

• 25-64 years: 7-9 hours

• >65 years: 6-8 hours

No one person’s circadian rhythm is the same: each individual will have their own body clocks. Finding your own circadian rhythm and working in harmony with it is a key factor in achieving the kind of solid, sound and nourishing sleep that dreams are made of.

Works Cited

Why lack of sleep is bad for your health (2015, June 15). Retrieved February 8, 2017, from http://www.nhs.uk/Livewell/tiredness-and-fatigue/Pages/lack-of-sleep-health-risks.aspx
Berkley, C. (n.d.). What You Eat Can Sabotage Your Sleep. Retrieved February 9, 2017, from http://www.webmd.com/sleep-disorders/features/food-sabotage-sleep#1


How much sleep do we really need? (2017, February 8). Retrieved from National Sleep Foundation (n.d.). Retrieved February 8, 2017, from https://sleepfoundation.org/how-sleep-works/how-much-sleep-do-we-really-need/page/0/2 Peri, C. (2014, February 13).

10 Things to Hate About Sleep Loss (J. Beckman MD, Ed.). Retrieved February 8, 2017, from http://www.webmd.com/sleep-disorders/features/10-results-sleep-loss#3