alternative therapy

#AltMeds: Physiotherapy

Curious about alternative therapies? You’re not alone! It’s a vast world of drug-free health practice and can be confusing at the best of times.

As with any professional, it's important to see the right person for the right job. You wouldn't go to a hairdresser for a toothache (!) so it makes sense to familiarise yourself with the vast range of practitioners out there.

As a GP, I am frequently asked about what a Physiotherapist does. Read on to learn more about Physiotherapy and how it could potentially help you.

 

What Is Physiotherapy?

Originating in Ancient Greece with massage techniques and hydrotherapy, today physiotherapy utilises non-surgical procedures to lessen pain, improve movement and restore functionality to the musculoskeletal system.

Physiotherapists assess, treat and prevent disorders caused by injury or disease. They conduct examinations of patients and work towards alleviating any impairments and limitations.

A typical session with a physiotherapist is unique to a patient’s needs and their health condition. Physiotherapists will also educate their patients to prevent further injuries, or assist them to live with ongoing conditions.

 

Qualifications & Education

According to the Australian Physiotherapy Association, Physiotherapy courses vary across the country and entry may be through a bachelor, masters or professional doctorate program.

Physiotherapists are required by law to be registered with the Physiotherapists Registration Board in the state or territory in which they are practising.

 

Who Should See A Physiotherapist?

All Australians can benefit from physiotherapy at some point in their lives. While it is well-known that physiotherapists treat injuries, increasing numbers of Australians are coming to physiotherapists when they want to take control of their health and stay well.

Physiotherapists work closely with GPs and other health clinicians to plan and manage treatment. Indeed, GPs refer more patients to physiotherapists than any other healthcare profession.

As far as alternative therapies go, I refer my patients to Physotherapists as they back up what they do with both diagnostic imaging and scientific evidence. Important!

Make sure you shop around for the right practitioner and chat to your GP about whether physiotherapy is the right treatment for your symptoms.

#AltMeds: Chiropractic Therapy

Curious about alternative therapies? You’re not alone! It’s a vast world of drug-free health practice and can be confusing at the best of times.

As with any professional, it's important to see the right person for the right job. You wouldn't go to a hairdresser for a toothache (!) so it makes sense to familiarise yourself with the vast range of practitioners out there.

As a GP, I am frequently asked about what a Chiropractor does. Read on to learn more about Chiropractors and how chiropractic practice could potentially help you.

 

What Is Chiropractic Therapy?

Chiropractic Therapy was invented in the late 1800s to align the body and spine. According to the Chiropractic Association of NSW, chiropractic practice 'focuses on the relationship between structure (primarily the spine) and function (as coordinated by the nervous system) and how that relationship affects the preservation and restoration of health.'

Chiropractors don’t use drugs or medicine. Chiropractic therapy relies on the inherent recuperative power of the body to heal itself, without drugs or surgery.

Professional chiropractors recognise the value and responsibility of working in cooperation with other health care practitioners in the best interests of the patient.

 

Qualifications & Education

Australian chiropractors study at university for a minimum of five years, graduating with either a double Bachelor's Degree in Chiropractic Science and Clinical Science, or a Master's Degree, depending on their university.

Interestingly, Australia was the first country in the world to incorporate chiropractic courses within the university system in the 1970's.

After entering a practice, all chiropractors must complete continuing professional development courses and seminars to upgrade and improve their skills and to stay current on the latest scientific research.

 

Who Should See A Chiropractor?

I recommend that Chiropractors are ONLY suitable to treat adults with postural, bone or muscular problems, including:

  • Back pain
  • Shoulder and arm pain
  • Buttock and leg pain
  • Headaches and migraines
  • Sciatica

Chiropractors can also treat adult athletes for increased performance enhancement and flexibility.

Before visiting any specialised health care professional, talk to your GP to determine whether a chiropractor can help you.

As with any health practitioner, shop around to find the right person for you.